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Malwarebytes Has Discovered the First Mac Malware of 2017.

The folks at Malwarebytes have discovered a new malware on the MacOS, according to them, it’s the first Mac Malware of 2017. Fruitfly is the name.

Yes, MacBooks have their fair share of malware, but it is a relatively rare phenomenon.

Anyway, the malware runs at the backend using the antiquated codes that remain undetected, the code relies on “OSX.Backdoor.Quimitchin,” which uses the same code that exists before OS X itself.  In other words, it uses ancient code that nobody’s looking for anymore.  Once it affects your system, it can perform actions like typing, webcam, screen captures, moving and clicking a mouse on its own.
How it spreads: Unfortunately Malwarebytes hasn’t nailed that down quite yet. They believe the malware is targeting biomedical research institutions, but past that we don’t know more.
The only way to detect this malware is to download a malware software — Malwarebytes has one (Malwarebytes). However, Apple is aware of this and is working on fixing it through an update. (The Apple fangirl in me says: This is one edge the MacOS has over a Windows OS)

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4 comments on “Malwarebytes Has Discovered the First Mac Malware of 2017.

  1. ỌBÁDÁRÀ says:

    …WELL,I HAVE A’WAYS LOOKED AT PEOPLE SAYING APPLE PRODUCTS DON’T GET INFECTED BY VIRUS AS TECNODULL iSHEEPS. WHAT’S EVEN MY CONCERN? I DON’T HAVE ANY APPLE PRODUCT…

  2. pWilliams says:

    at least it’s not as much as it is on other platforms

  3. KingAbsolute says:

    Fixing it is the only option they have.

  4. A group of researchers uncovered potentially deadly zero-day vulnerabilities in both iOS and Mac OS X operating systems, that could allow attackers get access to the passwords in Keychain and even bypass the App Store’s security checks – including stealing passwords from installed apps.
    The researchers as a proof-of-concept created and published a malicious app (dubbed XARA) on the App Store that was able to siphon users’ personal data. It allows anyone bypass the OS X sandboxing mechanisms that are supposedly designed to prevent an app from accessing the credentials, contacts, and other important data related to other apps.

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